UN’s Deputy Secretary-General, Ms Amina Mohammed has said it will take 170 years to achieve economic equality between women and men.

This was contained in the message Mohammed sent to the Youth Forum of the Commission on the Status of Women, in preparation for the International Commission on the Status of Women. The UN scribe confirmed that women and girls were being coerced to contend with higher obstacles to opportunity than men and boys.

“Gender-based discrimination, marginalization, violence and other human rights abuses; unequal access to education, to health care; these are basic rights and also to opportunities for leadership and participation. This list goes on and on.

“The barriers are so high that it would take 170 years to achieve economic equality between women and men; 170 years!

“I’m sorry but I do not accept a world that says – equality is not good enough for you or me or our daughters,” she added.

The deputy UN scribe urged young women on for opportunities by deliberate effort other than waiting for such to fall on their laps. She said that waiting for such may not come to be.

“I’m not waiting. I know you’re not waiting. When I was your age I was never waiting. I was always being told to take it easy or time will come.

“And I was always thinking my time is now. So, our world can’t wait. Building a better world won’t happen on its own,” she said.

“We live in a world that is out of balance. Eight people hold the same wealth as half of humanity. All of them are men, by the way.

“Joblessness – particularly for young people – is on the rise. In many parts of the world, it is completely off the charts.

“And when you see data that just aggregates a figure, look behind the data to the people, the faces and where they are.”

However, Mohammed lamented on growing mistrust and insecurity, which makes the people feel left out of the decision making  that impact their lives.

“We often talk about the youth and their future but your future is now. No one faces these stark imbalances more than the world’s women and girls.”

In her comment, she said the current youth population is the largest that the world has ever seen. This, she termed, something really historic.

“Today, 1.8 billion young people are between the ages of 10 and 24.

“Every one of them has hopes. Every one of them has aspirations. Every one of them has his own unique dream.

“I may have a fancy job that is called the Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations. But I have to tell you my job description is simple.

“It’s about a world that I want to build where every girl and boy has the tools, the structures and the support to make their dreams a reality.”

Investing in women and girls, according to Mohammed, pays for everyone- families, communities, societies at large, economies and most importantly, the female folks.

“So let’s focus on getting things done, taking those ambitions into real practicality, keeping in mind one of my favourite Nigerian proverbs: ‘Fine words do not produce food’.

“Rhetoric has its place but implementation matters – practical action. I am counting on you to be the change agents and torchbearers that we so desperately need.

“I know that you are well on your way. When I look out today, I do see the future. But I see it now. The actions that you can take as you walk out these doors.

“It’s a future of equality. A future of justice. A future of dignity for women and girls and for all humanity. Let’s make that happen.”

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